Bread and Roses

Discussion and reviews of books and other items of interest to our members.

Bread and Roses

Postby Abner » Sat Nov 24, 2007 5:44 am

This move probably does not inspire many on this board, but I like it. Talk about true courage.

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/180448604 ... 1402-44704

Abner
Abner
Senior Member
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 7:47 pm
Location: Iowa

Postby John Bear » Sun Dec 02, 2007 7:01 pm

It is a good one, Abner. (My grandmother said that she used to sing the fine song, Bread and Roses, while marching on the picket lines for the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.) (As she put it, "I sewed neckties for a dollar a day, went to negotiation sessions in the evening, and when necessary came back with the Molotov cocktails at dawn." Here's the song sung by the Mt. Holyoke choir; pleasant, but not equal to the vibrant Judy Collins version.

There is another extraordinary film, Salt of the Earth, about a miners' strike in New Mexico. It was made in 1953 by many of the then-blacklisted 'Hollywood Ten," and our fine democratic government was successful in getting all the major film distributors and theater chains to boycott it. The entire film can be viewed at http://www.archive.org/details/salt_of_the_earth
John Bear
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:12 am
Location: California

Postby John Bear » Sun Dec 02, 2007 7:02 pm

As I tried to say, here's the song: http://www.alumnae.mtholyoke.edu/reunions/songs1.php
John Bear
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:12 am
Location: California

Postby uncle janko » Sun Dec 02, 2007 9:02 pm

Brings back memories. Thanks.
Doing good, doing well, raising hope and raising hell. Janko Shave.
"Airplane music? Just like music for big bees, only louder."--Arnold Schoenberg
uncle janko
Senior Member
 
Posts: 4674
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 4:04 am

Postby Abner » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:08 pm

John Bear wrote:It is a good one, Abner. (My grandmother said that she used to sing the fine song, Bread and Roses, while marching on the picket lines for the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.) (As she put it, "I sewed neckties for a dollar a day, went to negotiation sessions in the evening, and when necessary came back with the Molotov cocktails at dawn." Here's the song sung by the Mt. Holyoke choir; pleasant, but not equal to the vibrant Judy Collins version.

There is another extraordinary film, Salt of the Earth, about a miners' strike in New Mexico. It was made in 1953 by many of the then-blacklisted 'Hollywood Ten," and our fine democratic government was successful in getting all the major film distributors and theater chains to boycott it. The entire film can be viewed at http://www.archive.org/details/salt_of_the_earth


Thanks so much Dr. Bear! Instead of doing my homework, I ended up watching this movie. I am glad I did, it only inspires me even more. I will continue in my labor movement struggles. Being called a "Protectionist" does not affect me. Just as corporations have the democratic right to lobby and protect their interests, so does labor. This may not be a popular stance to take, but I don't care about being popular.

Have a good day!

Abner 8)
Abner
Senior Member
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 7:47 pm
Location: Iowa

Postby uncle janko » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:17 pm

The old imperialist statist blackguard reactionary asks: what's wrong with being a protectionist?

PS. Abner, is it true that Lulu is organising Ace for the IWW? I hear rumours.
Doing good, doing well, raising hope and raising hell. Janko Shave.
"Airplane music? Just like music for big bees, only louder."--Arnold Schoenberg
uncle janko
Senior Member
 
Posts: 4674
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 4:04 am

Postby Abner » Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:02 am

uncle janko wrote:The old imperialist statist blackguard reactionary asks: what's wrong with being a protectionist?

PS. Abner, is it true that Lulu is organising Ace for the IWW? I hear rumours.


Absolutely nothing. The problem lies in present perception, or word play if you will. The word protectionist has been manipulated in a way to imply protection of old, outdated ways that have no relevance in todays society. A protectionist is "labeled" by my right wing friends as a dinosaur, as if one should not try to stop/improve or slow down things like NAFTA because "that is just the way of the future, just accept it." So, the way you pose the question Father, please, by all means call me a protectionist! :) Come 2008 we will boot out the present NLRB appointees and replace them with appointees that give a shyte about labor relations.

As far as Lulu and her organising activities, I can neither deny or confirm those rumors at this time. :)

Brother Abner 8)
Abner
Senior Member
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 7:47 pm
Location: Iowa

Postby John Bear » Mon Dec 03, 2007 4:24 am

20 years ago, when we lived in Mendocino, the neighboring town of Albion had the one and only remaining "Local" of the IWW, which maintained a small national headquarters in Chicago. They had organized lumber and fishing boat employees in the 1920s, and it was still rolling along. The headquarters did little more than give interviews and sell copies of The Little Red Song Book for 50 cents.

After my father was blacklisted as a screenwriter for Fox, he ended up managing a molasses factory near Los Angeles. Ships would come in, hook up a hose, and pump molasses into the tanks. Then one day an organizer for the Longshoreman's union arrived, and said that whenever a ship was being unloaded, they would need to hire a full 11 man crew. My father pointed out that it took zero people to unload that kind of ship. Following a heated discussion, my father flew up to SF to meet with Harry Bridges. Bridges started in on his usual rant, about 'you plutocrats' who don't respect and honor unions. My father got out his Screenwriters Guild card and set it in front of Bridges. The Guild was one of the most liberal and crusading unions, under the guidance of a guy named Ronald Reagan. Bridges was suitably surprised and impressed, and cordial talks followed. They agreed that the molasses company would hire one union monitor when a ship was in, to make sure that no physical cargo was being handled, and everything went smoothly thereafter. During my high school years, I worked summers at National Molasses Co., mostly doing Brix tests, and occasionally dumping 50 pound bags of Urea (dried Norwegian cow urine) into the huge tanks of molasses. (And how did you think the vitamins got into your bottle of Grandma's Molasses?)
John Bear
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:12 am
Location: California

Postby Abner » Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:28 am

John Bear wrote:20 years ago, when we lived in Mendocino, the neighboring town of Albion had the one and only remaining "Local" of the IWW, which maintained a small national headquarters in Chicago. They had organized lumber and fishing boat employees in the 1920s, and it was still rolling along. The headquarters did little more than give interviews and sell copies of The Little Red Song Book for 50 cents.

After my father was blacklisted as a screenwriter for Fox, he ended up managing a molasses factory near Los Angeles. Ships would come in, hook up a hose, and pump molasses into the tanks. Then one day an organizer for the Longshoreman's union arrived, and said that whenever a ship was being unloaded, they would need to hire a full 11 man crew. My father pointed out that it took zero people to unload that kind of ship. Following a heated discussion, my father flew up to SF to meet with Harry Bridges. Bridges started in on his usual rant, about 'you plutocrats' who don't respect and honor unions. My father got out his Screenwriters Guild card and set it in front of Bridges. The Guild was one of the most liberal and crusading unions, under the guidance of a guy named Ronald Reagan. Bridges was suitably surprised and impressed, and cordial talks followed. They agreed that the molasses company would hire one union monitor when a ship was in, to make sure that no physical cargo was being handled, and everything went smoothly thereafter. During my high school years, I worked summers at National Molasses Co., mostly doing Brix tests, and occasionally dumping 50 pound bags of Urea (dried Norwegian cow urine) into the huge tanks of molasses. (And how did you think the vitamins got into your bottle of Grandma's Molasses?)


Very interesting! Great stuff, I love it. Are you serious about the cow urine being in molasses? Do they still put urine in molasses?

Abner
Abner
Senior Member
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 7:47 pm
Location: Iowa

Postby John Bear » Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:44 am

Abner: Are you serious about the cow urine being in molasses? Do they still put urine in molasses?

John: I've been out of molasses for many decades (and boy, does it feel good). A quick Google search for "molasses" + "urea" (which is the dried urine) makes it pretty clear that it is added to the molasses that is used as cattle feed (probably its major use). Not clear to me if it is added to the consumer product. (A look at the Grandma's and the Brer Rabbit sites seems to suggest they are made with no additives.)

(I do remember seeing José, whose job was opening and closing valves on the huge tanks, peeing into a tank. He said something like, "Cow pee -- José pee -- what's the difference?")
John Bear
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:12 am
Location: California

Postby Abner » Mon Dec 03, 2007 3:14 pm

[quote="John Bear"]Abner: Are you serious about the cow urine being in molasses? Do they still put urine in molasses?

John: I've been out of molasses for many decades (and boy, does it feel good). A quick Google search for "molasses" + "urea" (which is the dried urine) makes it pretty clear that it is added to the molasses that is used as cattle feed (probably its major use). Not clear to me if it is added to the consumer product. (A look at the Grandma's and the Brer Rabbit sites seems to suggest they are made with no additives.)

(I do remember seeing José, whose job was opening and closing valves on the huge tanks, peeing into a tank. He said something like, "Cow pee -- José pee -- what's the difference?")[/
quote]

Ay Doctor Oso! You must be funnin me! :lol: :lol:

Abner 8)
Abner
Senior Member
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 7:47 pm
Location: Iowa


Return to Books & Reviews

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest