Dunleavy's dissertation how-to book

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Dunleavy's dissertation how-to book

Postby uncle janko » Mon Mar 06, 2006 6:20 pm

This is taken from another thread. Rich Douglas and I ran across this book independently of one another. Both of us like it. If you aren't getting good help from your master's paper or doc paper supervisor, this book can be a godsend. When I was at a B&M university and my diss supervisor was far less than helpful, this book would have saved endless tsuris.

Patrick Dunleavy, Authoring a PhD

Here's the stuff from the other thread. Rich gives the ISBN #.

Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2006 6:53 pm Post subject:

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I am currently reading "Authoring a PhD" by Patrick Dunleavy. It is definitely written from a British uni point of view, and has a good section on the differences between the "big book" approach of thesis-only programs and the "little book" approach of taught degrees (like those in the U.S. ISBN: 1-4039-0584-3. Highly recommended.

(Also just got a copy of the updated "PhD Trap." Have't gotten to it, though....
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Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:15 pm Post subject:

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Hi Rich:

The Dunleavy book is a prize! I found it about a year ago and got more useful help on how to do a diss out of any ten pages in the thing than I did in all my time at Torq U.
I'm gonna duplicate this stuff in the books section.

Cheers,
Janko
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Postby Jimmy » Mon Mar 06, 2006 8:36 pm

Thanks Uncle Janko. This will come in handy when I enroll in the SATS doctoral program. By the way, shouldn't is be "each other" and not "one another"? You're always so good about pointing out others' grammatical errors, including mine, that I just couldn't resist. :)

Oh well, while posting this I did a quick check and it appears the rule is arbitrary and either one is correct. Sorry Uncle Janko, guess I should have known you'd not post incorrect grammar. :oops:
Jimmy
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Postby uncle janko » Mon Mar 06, 2006 9:33 pm

Jawellnofine. :wink:
Doing good, doing well, raising hope and raising hell. Janko Shave.
"Airplane music? Just like music for big bees, only louder."--Arnold Schoenberg
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Postby Rich Douglas » Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:44 am

Others I love:

How to Complete and Survive Your Doctoral Dissertation by David Sternberg

Successful Dissertations and Theses by David Madsen

Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches by John Creswell

Student's Guide to Analysis of Variance by M. Roberts (Excellent for using ANOVA and post-hoc tests)

Love 'em all! 8)
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Postby Tireman4 » Tue Mar 07, 2006 8:01 pm

Rich,

This is a book that you mentioned on Degreeinfo awhile back.


Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day: A Guide to Starting, Revising, and Finishing Your Doctoral Thesis (Paperback) by Joan Bolker. I have it and I like it. It did get quite a chuckle out of my historiography class at the University of Houston. They ( my colleagues) thought it was funny, but in actuality, it can be done with patience.
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More recommended titles

Postby Roscoe » Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:56 pm

Rich, Janko, John:

Thanks a bunch for listing these titles. I can't wait to get my copies.

I also use two other titles that were recommended at the site:

Levicoff recommended, The Craft of Research by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams.

I have fallen in love with that one.

Russell recommended, "Quality Research Papers" by Nancy Jean Vyhmeister.

Several profs in South Africa have recommended, "Practical Research" by Paul D. Leedy, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod.

A former prof at UNIZUL said he taught directly from Leedy.

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Oops!

Postby Roscoe » Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:59 pm

In the previous email, I meant books that were recommended at "the other site."

Roscoe
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Postby uncle janko » Tue Mar 28, 2006 7:16 am

Hi Roscoe:
Booth et al. is a solid, very helpful book, and Vyhmeister is pretty good, too, but not quite as jam-packed as Booth. Either one should be helpful.
Bolker is witty and very kind, too.
I don't know the Leedy & Ormrod--but I'm going to look for it. Thanks!
Janko
Doing good, doing well, raising hope and raising hell. Janko Shave.
"Airplane music? Just like music for big bees, only louder."--Arnold Schoenberg
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Postby Tireman4 » Tue Mar 28, 2006 2:19 pm

Unk,

Another amazing book that I love is A Short Guide to Writing About History by Richard Marius. Absolutely the finest how to book on writing I have come across. This book will be my key to getting out of jams.
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Postby Roscoe » Fri Mar 31, 2006 8:08 am

Thanks, Tireman.

Just got that book in the mail.

I look forward to reading it. Looks like a good resource for writing articles.

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Postby Roscoe » Fri Mar 31, 2006 8:12 am

I'm curious...

After thinking about the research books recommended here, I'm wondering if these are the types of books that students in U.S. doc programs read during their first couple of years before embarking on the proposal and dissertation.

Does anyone have any ideas on this?

It seems that under the UK/SA/AUS system, where research docs are offered, it is assumed that students have already studied this type of material.

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