South Korean ferry disaster

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South Korean ferry disaster

Postby nosborne48 » Fri Apr 18, 2014 1:37 pm

We dont know yet what happened but here is yet another demonstration that modern passenger vessels are DANGEROUS.

Three quarters of the passengers, largely teenagers, died. 20 of 29 crew survived. Crew, you see, are trained. They know what to do to stay alive.

Best guess is that the ship capsized from taking too sharp a turn. In a properly designed vessel, this should be impossible. But to increase capacity as cheaply as possible ships are built up ever higher above the waterline. Look at any modern cruise ship compared to a traditional ocean liner and you will see what I mean.

Owners do not go to sea.
Una cosa mala nunca muere.
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Re: South Korean ferry disaster

Postby Rich Douglas » Sat Apr 19, 2014 1:23 am

I wonder if the survival ratios were also affected by who was where when. I suspect your survival is largely based on where you are when the disaster strikes. Other than the engine room, those crew members were probably near the outer surfaces of the ship.
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Re: South Korean ferry disaster

Postby Eric » Mon Apr 21, 2014 9:47 am

I wander if registered qualified professional Engineers were a part of designing the sheep. Its a public safety issue.
Increasing number of companies are bypassing the need to hire professional engineers. The results are poor design.


I think internationally in all countries the crew is trained to be the last to abandon a sheep, first they suppose to evacuate the passages, children and woman, elderly and the rest.

A lot went wrong there.
Eric

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Re: South Korean ferry disaster

Postby nosborne48 » Mon Apr 21, 2014 4:26 pm

Yes, Eric, they probably were, at least in the initial design and build.

Theoretically, every inspected ship undergoes building and any major modification under the continuous supervision of inspectors from the relevant (non-governmental) Classification Society. Ours, for example, is the American Bureau of Shipping or ABS. The Classification Society reports determine whether a ship and its cargo can obtain insurance and if so, at what rates and for what routes and services. The ship owners must also obtain various annual inspections with a full drydock inspection of hull and machinery every five years as a matter of international law.

Here in the United States, we used to require additional supervision from the U.S. Coast Guard. That requirement was deregulated under the ever-so-Republican notion that no underwriter would insure an unsafe vessel so the governmental supervision was an unnecessary burden on the industry. As a former Merchant Mariner myself, this seemed an outrageous move at the time but in practice it seems not to have made anybody noticeably less safe. I don't know if that's because money is a sufficient motivator or because the USCG didn't do a very good job. Take your pick; I thought the Coasties were pretty thorough.

I used to go through annual FCC ship radio station inspections; those guys were pretty thorough but if you were the radio operator you knew a lot more about whether your station would function in an emergency than the inspectors could hope to learn. These days, the annual radio inspections are privatized and again, I have heard nothing to suggest that system doesn't work just fine.

South Korean merchant shipbuilders are the best and most modern in the world, though it pains me to say so. They have an excellent record and deserve their reputations. But every ship design is a complex compromise between safety, speed and economy and sometimes, when a major modification is performed, it has unforeseen consequences to the ship as a unit.

I suppose it is barely possible that the Korean ferry was modified in some significant way without the benefit of a proper Naval Architect. If this were a fish processing vessel, say, the possibilities would be much greater. But an inspected passenger ship? Hmm...seems very unlikely to me. Yet obviously SOMETHING was very wrong!
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Re: South Korean ferry disaster

Postby Rich Douglas » Mon Apr 21, 2014 5:38 pm

Rich Douglas wrote:I wonder if the survival ratios were also affected by who was where when. I suspect your survival is largely based on where you are when the disaster strikes. Other than the engine room, those crew members were probably near the outer surfaces of the ship.


Whoops. There are reports that the captain directed passengers to stay in their rooms. That's sad.
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