What makes a good unaccredited program?

Discussions on the value or merit of unaccredited programs and institutions.

What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby T.J. Gentry » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:26 pm

I am interested in what the forum thinks regarding the essentials of a good UA program. I ask from the perspective of one who received training in two UA programs that are probably not so great, and as one who currently work with a UA program that is trying to offer substance. I am specifically interested in UA ministry training programs.

Thanks.

TJG
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby nosborne48 » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:56 pm

For an unaccredited program to have any credibility to me, it has to have SOME recognition from some legitimate agency or group not connected with itself. My favorite example is the Northwestern California University School of Law. www.nwculaw.edu

The school is completely unaccredited but its J.D. graduates are eligible to take the California Bar exam. Not only does this demonstrate that the school's J.D. degree has some actual utility, the school's Baby Bar and Bar exam passage rates are published by the California State Bar for all the world to see.
Una cosa mala nunca muere.
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby T.J. Gentry » Sat Feb 12, 2011 12:09 am

So in the ministry training context, perhaps a good UA school is one that meets legitimate ministerial credentialing requirements?

TJG
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby Jimmy » Sat Feb 12, 2011 1:04 am

T.J. Gentry wrote:So in the ministry training context, perhaps a good UA school is one that meets legitimate ministerial credentialing requirements?

TJG


May I ask your denomination? That would help considerably.
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby T.J. Gentry » Sat Feb 12, 2011 3:32 am

I am an Associate Reformed Presbyterian. Ordinarily we require a 90 hour MDiv or equivalent.
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby Jimmy » Sat Feb 12, 2011 9:43 pm

T.J. Gentry wrote:I am an Associate Reformed Presbyterian. Ordinarily we require a 90 hour MDiv or equivalent.


Many years ago I looked into the ARPC. Of all the reformed denominations, I really liked what I discovered back then. I really liked their Confession of Faith. I think the ARPC and the Cumberland Presbyterian Church are my favortie reformed denominations even though they are quite different from each other.

Anyway, I am not sure, but perhaps the ARPC will accept a degree from one of the schools accredited by The Association of Reformed Theological Seminaries.
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby Hungry Ghost » Mon Feb 14, 2011 7:48 pm

T.J. Gentry wrote:I am interested in what the forum thinks regarding the essentials of a good UA program.


It depends on what you're looking for.

If you don't have a degree objective and are just seeking education for its own sake, then it's pretty much up to you. Does a particular program offer subjects that are of interest to you? What kind of approach does it take to those subjects? Who teaches the classes and what are their reputations? Does the content appear to be at an appropriate level and not too crankish? What are others in your field saying about the school and the program? Taking individual DL classes is kind of like reading a book, I guess, except more interactive. Oftentimes we find that books that initially looked good aren't very helpful. If university level classes don't turn out to be helpful, then you can always drop them and move on.

If you do have a degree objective, then the fact that the school that awards the degrees isn't accredited is much more problematic.

What you need to be looking for in that case is reputation, I guess. Who takes the school seriously? You can get a feeling for that by using Google and by doing some searches. Do searches for mentions of the school and programs on .edu domains to see what other universities are saying about it. It's generally a law of nature - if a school awards advanced degrees, especially doctorates, then other schools offering similar subjects will take notice. They will include the program on lists of programs, they will refer to work being done in the program and they will oftentimes collaborate with its faculty on various projects.

Don't just count .edu hits though, you need to actually look at what people are saying. A few legitimate universities run poorly-moderated public discussion forums and mills post their school's name on these to generate .edu hits. And there's Academia.edu, a social networking site for academics, that mills use to get their names into .edu searches. So be discerning.

Do searches for the school and program on .gov sites to see what various government agencies are saying about them. Look for significant indications of academic substance like grants awarded. Do a search on Google scholar for academic publications that have the school listed as the author's institutional affiliation.

Generally speaking, I think that it's safe to say that the stronger the reputational signature a school presents, the more success its graduate are likely to have in professional acceptance and hiring. That's true for accredited schools as well as unaccredited ones.

Here's an old thread about what I consider America's best currently-unaccredited PhD program:

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2208&p=19242

I'm still hoping that they can produce the first California-approved Nobel Prize before they are eventually accredited by WASC. One of their scientists has already won the prestigious Japan Prize for his work on explaining the mechanisms of cell adhesion.
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby T.J. Gentry » Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:52 am

Thank you. That was very helpful information.
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby patrickfrye » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:44 am

Yes its Depends on the appropriate field or discipline. If said field or regulation has PA requirements like psychology, nursing , and other professional fields . I want to know more about university continuing education essay writing if anyone has experiences pls share here. Thanks
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby larryjf » Sat Oct 29, 2011 1:56 pm

The North American Reformed Seminary (http://www.tnars.net) is a free unaccredited seminary that has acceptance by a regionally accredited school (Biblical Seminary) as well as other schools and denominations.

Full disclosure: I work with the school
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Re: What makes a good unaccredited program?

Postby nathan » Fri May 18, 2012 1:37 pm

T.J. Gentry wrote:Thank you. That was very helpful information.

i think that is not helpful. may i ask you about st Alcuin house. they seem nice. since you are a graduate there you can tell me regarding their dissertation requirement and proceedings.
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