California considers closing all unaccredited schools

Discussions on the value or merit of unaccredited programs and institutions.

Re: California considers closing all unaccredited schools

Postby SteveFoerster » Tue Jul 22, 2014 9:17 pm

Oregon wrote:
SteveFoerster wrote:Anyone who sees the drawback in the U.S. earning a reputation for being a place where you can cheat foreigners with impunity, for starters.

Then let's clean up all the schools that charge $ 20- $30 - $40,000 per year for mediocre cookie-cutter degrees. There is another name for charging $120,000 for 4 years of babysitting - that would be racketeering.

Fair enough, then the best way to do that is to revamp the student loan system so that it's market based, rather than enabling those who aren't creditworthy to borrow themselves over their heads. All that money in the system that otherwise wouldn't be there drives up tuition rates.
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Re: California considers closing all unaccredited schools

Postby hierophant » Tue May 10, 2016 1:57 pm

John Bear wrote:Last week, the Legislature held its Joint Oversight Sunset Hearing on the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE). There was no interest in letting the Bureau sunset into oblivion. But, unexpectedly (well, I didn’t expect it), there was serious interest in requiring all state-approved schools either to gain recognized accreditation or stop awarding degrees—the so-called “up or out” law.

Das William, chair of the Assembly’s Higher Education Committee, supported the idea, and so did the chair of BPPE, Joanne Wenzel.


Update is that this was passed some time ago. California now requires new applicants for BPPE approval to have at least an accreditation plan and the applicants need to convince the BPPE that it's serious and achievable, something more than talk. Then there's a time-limit for achieving accreditation. I believe that existing unaccredited schools also face the time limit.

On the other hand, I believe that the small-print only requires that a minimum of one degree program have accreditation, so lots of these schools are tripping over each other to contact ACBSP in hopes of getting an MBA program accredited.

Wenzel pointed out there are about 150 unaccredited degree-granting schools that would be affected by such a law, saying that some of them offer inferior degrees, and tend to focus on foreign and immigrant students.


My sense is that a majority of them are run by immigrants themselves and serve the immigrants' communities. Greater LA is filled with little unaccredited 'universities' run by Korean Christians, each one offering a weird mix of Christian theology and 'oriental medicine', along with the inevitable MBAs. I guess that in that community, being a university founder or having a university administrator's title is a source of considerable prestige.

She said that the new law would ensure quality and save the state money by unburdening BPPE of having to deal with state approval. Wenzel was asked how many of her staff were dealing with unaccredited degree-granting schools. She said she did not know.


State approval won't go away that easily. New schools don't come out of the gate already accredited. They have to have been in operation for a period of time before that happens. And they will need to have been approved in order to operate legally for that initial period.
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Re: California considers closing all unaccredited schools

Postby SteveFoerster » Wed Jul 20, 2016 7:28 pm

hierophant wrote:
Wenzel pointed out there are about 150 unaccredited degree-granting schools that would be affected by such a law, saying that some of them offer inferior degrees, and tend to focus on foreign and immigrant students.


My sense is that a majority of them are run by immigrants themselves and serve the immigrants' communities. Greater LA is filled with little unaccredited 'universities' run by Korean Christians, each one offering a weird mix of Christian theology and 'oriental medicine', along with the inevitable MBAs. I guess that in that community, being a university founder or having a university administrator's title is a source of considerable prestige.

Northern Virginia has a whole lot of these also. I helped one of them get through Virginia's licensure process a number of years ago.
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