WGU-Texas

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WGU-Texas

Postby Tireman4 » Wed Aug 03, 2011 8:38 pm

Michael Mitchell
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Re: WGU-Texas

Postby Hungry Ghost » Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:09 pm

I'm curious what this announcement adds to what already exists.

The then-governor of Texas was among the governors that orginally proposed the creation of Western Governors' University, I believe. And Texas students are currently enrolled in WGU in roughly Texas' proportion to the whole US population.

Texas isn't currently proposing to direct any state funds to WGU, nor will Texas students receive any tuition reductions that I'm aware of. There don't seem to be any plans for WGU to open new physical facilities in Texas.

One possible benefit of this new proposal is that it might eventually make it easier for WGU graduates to qualify for Texas state teaching credentials. The Texas state education authorities seem to be on board with this WGU-Texas idea, whatever it is, so that's possible. Maybe the path to other TX state licenses will be smoother too. Of course, they can do that any time they wish without all the hand-waving.

I'm afraid that the cynic in me suggests that this might be just a Rick Perry publicity stunt.
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Re: WGU-Texas

Postby Tark » Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:12 am

The concept of a WGU state subsidiary is not new or unique to Texas. In fact, WGU Indiana is already up and running, and WGU Washington is being set up. WGU Texas will be the third.

I think the idea is that a "WGU State" school can be specifically tailored to meet the academic/professional requirements of a particular state. As a totally hypothetical example, suppose you take accounting classes online through WGU Indiana. In this case, there might be a guarantee that the credits will transfer into B&M programs at Indiana state universities and community colleges, and there might be a guarantee that they will meet the licensing requirements of the Indiana CPA Board. The same sort of thing could apply to teacher education, as you suggested.

You might not have such assurances with generic WGU classes; WGU obviously enrolls students from numerous states, and so their programs cannot be tailored towards any one state in particular. In contrast, WGU Indiana only admits Indiana residents, so they are free to develop customized WGU programs specifically to satisfy the existing Indiana educational/political establishment.
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Re: WGU-Texas

Postby Hungry Ghost » Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:27 pm

What you say makes sense.

I believe that many state licensing laws prescribe education in terms of hours of instruction and similar things. But WGU has a 'competency' model in which there isn't typically any set amount of time required for each subject, allowing students to study as long or as short a time as they need to display the required competencies. So creating a situation in which at least some of a state's licensing boards publicly endorse what WGU is doing might erase some of the ambiguities and increase student confidence.
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Re: WGU-Texas

Postby Jimmy » Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:46 pm

"Howdy." I'm sorry but that guy continues to come across as a clown and doofus!
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Re: WGU-Texas

Postby Tark » Mon Aug 08, 2011 7:08 pm

As far as I can tell, the "WGU State" schools are nothing more than administrative subdivisions of WGU. We are accustomed to seeing universities subdivided by academic disciplines (e.g. WGU has the "Teachers College", "College of Business"; "College of Health Professions"'; etc). But now WGU seems to be overlaying a second system of subdivision on top of this, which reflects state of residence.

The two systems coexist simultaneously. So the WGU College of Business can develop Indiana-oriented business courses, which then become part of WGU Indiana. But they can also develop Washington-oriented business courses, which become part of WGU Washington. Furthermore, WGU Indiana or WGU Washington can also include state-oriented education courses developed by WGU Teachers College, or state-oriented nursing courses developed by the WGU College of Health Professions.

So WGU Indiana is really an administrative entity within WGU; in effect it is the "WGU College for Indiana Residents". This explains why WGU Indiana and WGU Texas are regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (which covers the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington -- but not Indiana or Texas). WGU is based in Salt Lake City, Utah, and therefore has regional accreditation from the Northwest Commission; WGU Indiana and WGU Texas are subdivisions of Utah-based WGU.
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