Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

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Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Wed Nov 14, 2007 8:49 pm

Make your own "high" joke here, but...

Mel Huff wrote:Goddard refocused its resources on a model it had pioneered 40 years earlier, paid off its debt, accumulated a $500,000 surplus and is now poised to transplant the model of intensive low-residency programs for nontraditional adult students to other parts of the world...

This fall, the college reached a 25-year high in enrollment with 677 students. They come from 35 states and range in age from 20 to 80.

Early next year, [academic VP Kabba] Colley plans to initiate a community-wide discussion at Goddard that could lead to a center for global education. "What I would like to see us do is reach out to communities in Africa, in Latin America, in the Caribbean, in Asia to establish partnerships throughout the developing world. In the long term, I see a very viable center for global education here in central Vermont," he said.

[President Mark Shulman] said that his job for the rest of his tenure will be "to raise funds, both to sustain what we have here and to expand into these other programs." He added, "It is clear that maintaining the stability that we've only recently achieved here (is the priority), that none of the new adventures that we're engaging in can come at the expense of that."


Goddard goes global (Mel Huff, Staff Writer, The Barre Montpelier Times Argus, November 4, 2007)
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Postby Jonathan Whatley » Wed Nov 14, 2007 8:53 pm

The president's name spelled correctly is Mark Shulman.
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Postby Jonathan Whatley » Wed Nov 14, 2007 8:56 pm

No. It's Mark Schulman. Sorry, this was confusing. The article above, an article entirely about him in Inside Higher Ed, websites of Goddard affiliates, etc. use both spellings in the same source. I assume his President's Welcome at Goddard is right.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Sat Jul 02, 2011 4:06 pm

A few years later, a new president, and:

Barbara Vacarr, in her May inaugural as president of Goddard College, wrote:Here are the exciting facts about where we stand today:
I am proud to report that we have the highest enrollment in 30 years.
We have a contingency fund.
We just received a 10-year accreditation for the first time ever.
We have now a tremendous convergence of opportunity and an opening for sustainable growth.

The question is, as Tim Pitkin would say, what are we going to do about it?

We have arrived at a point in our history where we must return to our roots, and as your president I intend to take us there. Goddard College needs to get back to being what it has been from the beginning: a truly experimenting, even radical, college.


President Vacarr "left school at 15, got a GED, started college, and then dropped out 12 credits shy of [her] bachelor’s degree." She later went back to school at Lesley University, "whose model came directly from Goddard."

Mark Schulman, the evidently successful Goddard president above, is going into his second year as president of Saybrook University.

NB: Presidents Vacarr and Schulman are both doctoral alumni of Union.

Presidential Inauguration: Dr. Barbara Vacarr Inaugurated as Goddard College’s 10th President (from a speech delivered May 7, 2011, Goddard College)
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby levicoff » Sat Jul 02, 2011 4:39 pm

Jonathan Whatley wrote:NB: Presidents Vacarr and Schulman are both doctoral alumni of Union.

From the Union article cited by Jonathan:
Both Dr. Schulman, who graduated from UI&U in 1985, and Dr. Vacarr, who graduated in 1993, have woven UI&U’s mission and vision into their work in higher education...

So . . . If Schulman (who graduated when the school was still the Union for Experimenting Colleges & Universities) and Vacaar (who graduated when the school was still The Union Institute) are being claimed by the school as graduates of the renamed Union Institute & University, does that mean that I (having graduated in 1991, when it was still TUI) am also a graduate of UI&U?

Oh, crap . . . :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Nonetheless, I'm delighted to see that Goddard has prospered so well. (I had considered them for my M.A., but ended up deciding in favor of Vermont College, then part of Norwich University, for the M.A. Back then, the VC program was still colloquially called the "old Goddard graduate program," as it had originated at Goddard.)

Hopefully, Goddard won't make any mistakes and invite Mumia Abu Jamal as their commencement speaker. Antioch College did that, and look what happened. :mrgreen:
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Sat Jul 02, 2011 5:03 pm

levicoff wrote:Hopefully, Goddard won't make any mistakes and invite Mumia Abu Jamal as their commencement speaker. Antioch College did that, and look what happened. :mrgreen:

*cough...*
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby levicoff » Sat Jul 02, 2011 5:22 pm

Jonathan Whatley wrote:
levicoff wrote:Hopefully, Goddard won't make any mistakes and invite Mumia Abu Jamal as their commencement speaker. Antioch College did that, and look what happened. :mrgreen:

*cough...*

Wow . . . I knew about the Antioch address, but not about the Goddard. Can't say I'm surprised, though.

I generally don't speak out on political issues (I leave that to Jimmy), but on Mumia I make an exception. As eloquent a journalist as he might have been (and as eloquent a speaker as he still may be), at the end of the day, he's still a cop killer. I've always been 100% against capital punishment, but Mumia is hardly the guy I'd use to advance my argument. :lol:
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jimmy » Sat Jul 02, 2011 8:23 pm

levicoff wrote:...I generally don't speak out on political issues (I leave that to Jimmy), but on Mumia I make an exception. As eloquent a journalist as he might have been (and as eloquent a speaker as he still may be), at the end of the day, he's still a cop killer. I've always been 100% against capital punishment, but Mumia is hardly the guy I'd use to advance my argument. :lol:


Well, I always thought he was guilty as well as is Rubin "Hurricane" Carter. Having been reared in South, I always exercise caution when blacks are accused of murder but in these two cases, as well as O. J., I don't think there is any doubt as to their guilt. The only thing that I always had trouble with in the Jamal case was that the word of a prostitute was given so much credibility. Anyone who will sell their bodies will also sell their souls.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:51 pm

I'm a citizen of Canada and the United States and I've grown up submerged in the news media of both.

Off the top of my head, I can start to name a small handful of Canadians wrongfully convicted for terrible crimes whose convictions have been overturned in in the past twenty years or so. They come to mind immediately because they were enormous national scandals and their subjects are literally household names in the country. Donald Marshall, Steven Truscott, Guy Paul Morin, David Milgaard, the latter the subject of one of the saddest songs any country has played thousands of times on its radio.

As I write authorities have been spending the last few years going over hundreds of cases where an error-prone pathologist who was responsible for investigating almost all suspicious child deaths in Ontario may have led to wrongful convictions.

Again, I haven't gone out to research these. Every Canadian who has followed the news long enough can list these people by name. Can probably call up their faces.

Any parallels in the U.S., which has a very similar society and relatively similar, if anything, on the whole, likely broadly quicker to convict, system of justice?

And I'll cheat and look at Wikipedia, here and here. Rubin Hurricane Carter? Well now we can't even agree on him. And I probably know of him best from his second career as a local celebrity in my hometown, Toronto. I remember lots of coverage of Lawrencia Bembenek when I was young, when she was extradited from, er, Ontario.

Any exclusively American cases with wide national recognition? From the dusty pages of history, Sacco and Vanzetti and the Scottsboro Boys. I'd heard of Huey Newton and Geronimo Pratt but I'd only have recalled that they were Black Panther leaders, not that they'd had convictions that were overturned.

So when Canada catches a wrongful conviction the whole country tends to really go over the thing. The United States, not so much.

This has to influence, and is probably itself influenced by, attitudes to the death penalty in each country. Canada abolished the death penalty in the criminal code, which is within federal jurisdiction, by act of parliament in 1976. There was an obscure and barely noticed relic in military law, under which no one was executed before this too was abolished in 1998.

Polls will occasionally show pluralities or majorities of Canadians "support" the death penalty, but in the most incredibly ambivalent way: a right-wing populist newspaper tried this on in January: "Two-thirds of Canadians support the death penalty, according to a recent poll, although," emphasis mine, "less than half of the country wants the government to bring it back into Canadian law."

Yeah, some support there. If it ever became an active issue opponents of the death penalty would just take out ads basically saying: Donald Marshall. Steven Truscott. Guy Paul Morin. David Milgaard. And they'd have a song. And the nation would whisper oh, yes, that, and any move to actually reinstate the death penalty wouldn't get anywhere.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jimmy » Sat Jul 02, 2011 11:16 pm

Excellent post and very informative, Jonathan.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Sun Jul 03, 2011 3:46 pm

Thank you!

One other thing. With respect:

Jimmy wrote:The only thing that I always had trouble with in the Jamal case was that the word of a prostitute was given so much credibility. Anyone who will sell their bodies will also sell their souls.


I don't agree with this correspondence at all. On another current, high-profile criminal case, I agree with this.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jimmy » Sun Jul 03, 2011 4:36 pm

Jonathan Whatley wrote:Thank you!

One other thing. With respect:

Jimmy wrote:The only thing that I always had trouble with in the Jamal case was that the word of a prostitute was given so much credibility. Anyone who will sell their bodies will also sell their souls.


I don't agree with this correspondence at all. On another current, high-profile criminal case, I agree with this.


Wow! We just can't agree in this thread, can we? LOL! I believe his is guilty as sin.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Sun Jul 03, 2011 5:17 pm

Jimmy wrote:Wow! We just can't agree in this thread, can we? LOL! I believe his is guilty as sin.


To be clear, I haven't seen personally enough evidence to form a confident opinion on Strauss-Kahn's guilt or innocence, except that the claim deserves full investigation, and, aside from burdens of proof or evidence in any case against Strauss-Kahn which I respect, on a distinct interpersonal level, I feel a particular benefit of the doubt and tendency to assume good faith to, yes, his accuser. I haven't personally seen enough evidence to form a confident opinion on Abu-Jamal's guilt or innocence.

And we all in the thread so far oppose the death penalty.
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby levicoff » Sun Jul 03, 2011 6:41 pm

A-hem . . . To put this more on topic for a moment (since my off-the-cuff remark about Jamal led to a discourse on capital punishment).

Speaking of capital punishment, Anitoch College is back. (I know, that's a totally irrelevant comparison, but I couldn't resist. Orf is it irreverent? But I digress, which is not unusual in this forum.) :mrgreen:

My earlier reference got me to looking at Antioch's web site - now http://www.antiochcollege.org (interesting that they didn't go with .edu). It seems that they are getting back in the action and have commitments to enough major funding to at least start operations again.

Why is this relevant (to D/L)? Because Antioch College has a rich history with prominent grads (Rod Serling, Coretta Scott King, etc.), and because they launched the original non-traditional programs that are now part of Antioch University. Back in my day (whenever that was), we used to speak of two "Big Threes" - at the undergrad level, they were (and still are) Charter Oak, Edison, and Regents (now Excelsior). At the master's level, they were Antioch, Goddard, and Vermont College (then part of Norwich University). I had, in fact, applied to both Antioch and VCNU, accepted by both but opting to ultimately go with VCNU. Notably, VCNU's M.A. program was still, at that point, colloquially called the "Goddard Graduate Program," later the "old Goddard program" once Goddard started their new programs. (VCNU bought the old programs from Goddard, with a stipulation that Goddard not reenter the distance market for three years. Sure enough, three years later, Goddard started their new and now-current programs.)

Also notable: Antioch College's new web site makes it clear that they are not affiliated with Antioch University. They also note that they are unaccredited but hope to be accredited by the time their first class graduates (a ballsy statement to make at this juncture). My take is that they're not out of the woods by any means, but they appear to be seeing some daylight.

We now return you to the topic of state-sanctioned killing. :lol:
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Re: Goddard Enrollment at 25-Year High

Postby Jonathan Whatley » Sun Jul 03, 2011 7:28 pm

levicoff wrote:My earlier reference got me to looking at Antioch's web site - now http://www.antiochcollege.org (interesting that they didn't go with .edu). It seems that they are getting back in the action and have commitments to enough major funding to at least start operations again. [...]

They also note that they are unaccredited but hope to be accredited by the time their first class graduates (a ballsy statement to make at this juncture).

And that, when they're accredited, is when they can get .edu. :)
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