Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

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Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Eric » Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:48 am

Professional Registers

http://www.sciencecouncil.org/professional_registers


The launch of RSciTech and RSci alongside the established CSci award creates a framework of professional registration across the science workforce

The Professional Registers consist of the three designations below:
Chartered Scientist (CSci) is a well established award, with over 15,000 scientists having achieved it since its launch in 2004. Candidates will typically be in senior scientific or managerial roles, qualified to at least QCF level 7 and applying their knowledge in their roles.
Registered Science Technician (RSciTech) is a brand new award to provide recognition for those working in technical roles.
Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award to provide recognition for those working in scientific and higher technical roles.
To find out more please visit the Professional Registers website or contact Will Ravis

Category: CSciProfessional Registers

Looks like Science Council UK is mimicking Engineering Council.
Eric

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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby SteveFoerster » Mon Nov 26, 2012 2:19 pm

Ah, but do they offer registration for mad scientists?
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Eric » Mon Nov 26, 2012 4:00 pm

SteveFoerster wrote:Ah, but do they offer registration for mad scientists?


They may offer help with that to. Contact them. :-)
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Tark » Mon Nov 26, 2012 6:45 pm

The launch of RSciTech and RSci alongside the established CSci award creates a framework of professional registration across the science workforce

OK, so RSciTEch and RSci are new, and presumably could apply to any scientific discipline. But is the CSci award really necessary? The UK already has professional registration for Chartered Biologists, Chartered Chemists, Chartered Geologists, Chartered Physicists, etc.

Apparently the "Chartered Scientist" title is offered in addition to (for example) the "Chartered Biologist" title:

Under a license from the Science Council, the Society of Biology can now provide Registered Science Technician, Registered Scientist and Chartered Scientist statuses. This is in addition to its existing Chartered Biologist status, which is awarded to experienced biologists.

From a US perspective, the need for all of these official non-academic scientific titles seems questionable. In the US, non-academic professional scientific/engineering titles are only common in fields where state regulation defines a specific need for credentialed specialists.

So there are officially-recognized "Professional Engineers" -- but most US engineers never even apply for this title; it's only common among civil engineers, who are heavily regulated. I don't think there are any officially-recognized "Professional Scientists" in the US, except for "Professional Geologists", who work with civil engineers on regulated issues like faults, slopes, groundwater, etc.

So a biologist in the UK can become an officially-recognized "Chartered Biologist" and an officially-recognized "Chartered Scientist". The US, in contrast, grants no officially-recognized title to biologists specifically or to scientists in general. Why bother, unless there is some sort of official function that they need to perform ?
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Eric » Mon Nov 26, 2012 10:19 pm

Tark wrote:
The launch of RSciTech and RSci alongside the established CSci award creates a framework of professional registration across the science workforce

OK, so RSciTEch and RSci are new, and presumably could apply to any scientific discipline. But is the CSci award really necessary? The UK already has professional registration for Chartered Biologists, Chartered Chemists, Chartered Geologists, Chartered Physicists, etc.

Apparently the "Chartered Scientist" title is offered in addition to (for example) the "Chartered Biologist" title:

Under a license from the Science Council, the Society of Biology can now provide Registered Science Technician, Registered Scientist and Chartered Scientist statuses. This is in addition to its existing Chartered Biologist status, which is awarded to experienced biologists.

From a US perspective, the need for all of these official non-academic scientific titles seems questionable. In the US, non-academic professional scientific/engineering titles are only common in fields where state regulation defines a specific need for credentialed specialists.

So there are officially-recognized "Professional Engineers" -- but most US engineers never even apply for this title; it's only common among civil engineers, who are heavily regulated. I don't think there are any officially-recognized "Professional Scientists" in the US, except for "Professional Geologists", who work with civil engineers on regulated issues like faults, slopes, groundwater, etc.

So a biologist in the UK can become an officially-recognized "Chartered Biologist" and an officially-recognized "Chartered Scientist". The US, in contrast, grants no officially-recognized title to biologists specifically or to scientists in general. Why bother, unless there is some sort of official function that they need to perform ?


You raise good points.

Now just like Chartered Engineer the Chartered Scientist

http://www.charteredscientist.org/about-csci
CSci represents, a single chartered mark for all scientists, recognising high levels of professionalism and competence in science. There are currently around 15,000 Chartered Scientists working in a vast array of settings and across all scientific and related sectors. Search the profiles to get an idea of the diversity that makes up CSci.

Why?
Being chartered is the mark of professional recognition. Being a Chartered Scientist allows all scientists working at the full professional level to be recognised on an equal footing.
It gives an assurance of current competence through annual CPD monitoring, and encapsulates the interdisciplinary nature of science in the 21st Century.
By benchmarking professional scientists at the same high level, CSci aims to re-engage public trust and confidence in Science and scientists.


I'm Chartered Engineer and here in USA licensed member of NSPE.
This helped me, employers and hiring managers sometimes surprise me like CIO in leading US company that once interviewed me was Chartered IT Professional CITP MBCS.
It appears that extra certification / registration can be valuable in some cases.
I do spend 1/3 of the year in UK.

In our NSPE local chapter meetings we do have an open discussion, should all PE be Civil Engineers ?

I also don't rule out a level of satisfaction and pride that one may have from such title. I don't think its vanity title do.
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Rich Douglas » Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:38 pm

SteveFoerster wrote:Ah, but do they offer registration for mad scientists?


No, you have to sit quietly in the waiting room until you calm down. Then you can register.
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby RBTullo » Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:02 pm

Mad Scientist, would that be an (MSci)? Does that make Igor a (MSciTech)? LOL
"The only constant is change," Heraclitus
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Eric » Tue Nov 27, 2012 6:39 pm

RBTullo wrote:Mad Scientist, would that be an (MSci)? Does that make Igor a (MSciTech)? LOL


This is funny, a good one :-)
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby donnawhite » Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:02 am

Rich Douglas wrote:
SteveFoerster wrote:Ah, but do they offer registration for mad scientists?


No, you have to sit quietly in the waiting room until you calm down. Then you can register.

What about mad scientists? Please explain it is English word mad or there is a full-form of mad.
Sorry if this question is a bit odd :)
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby SteveFoerster » Thu Dec 06, 2012 2:14 pm

donnawhite wrote:What about mad scientists? Please explain it is English word mad or there is a full-form of mad.
Sorry if this question is a bit odd :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_scientist
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Re: Registered Scientist (RSci) is a brand new award

Postby Eric » Mon Dec 10, 2012 9:47 pm

Professional qualifications (a combination of academic qualifications and professional training and experience)

In EU to enable movement of workforce between Member States. The new directive 2005/36/EC, which came into effect on 20 October 2007, applies to all Member State nationals wishing to practice a regulated profession in a Member State other than the one in which they obtained their professional qualifications. The Directive works on the basic principle that an individual fully qualified to practice a regulated profession in one member state should be treated, in principle, as qualified to practice that same profession in another Member State.
In August 2007, Chartered Scientist was accepted for the purposes of the directive as a regulated profession, with the Science Council appointed as the Competent Authority.
Links:
Europe Open for Professions (http://www.dfes.gov.uk/europeopen/index.shtml)
European Commission guide to Professional Qualifications (http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/qua ... dex_en.htm)
ENIC-NARIC (http://www.enic-naric.net/)

I enjoy recognition under this directive of my CEng, MIET, State-certified Engineer BVT and other Professional Qualifications.

The RSci will also be added to directive of recognition in EU.
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