Tick, tick, tick . . .

Discussions on the value or merit of unaccredited programs and institutions.

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Tark » Fri Dec 10, 2010 11:51 pm

While I agree this is very sad and sickening, there have been literally hundreds of legitimately credentialed psychologists and psychiatrists who have faced criminal prosecution which basically means it's the person, not necessarily the credential that is problematic. Just my opinion, and that's all it is.

Except that legitimately credentialed psychologists and psychiatrists don't get prosecuted for having false credentials. And that's the issue in this case.

And one of the concerns is whether the defendant obtained and used titles from the American Psychotherapy Association as a substitute for his lack of legitimate credentials. As stated recently in one local news story:

questions have also been raised about just how meaningful the term "Board Certified Professional Counselor" is and just what a "Fellow, American Psychotherapy Association" is.
Tark
Senior Member
 
Posts: 590
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:42 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Jimmy » Sat Dec 11, 2010 2:28 am

You are correct, Tark. I would suggest critics of the American Association of Psychotherapy view their professional publication, Annals before becoming too critical.
Jimmy
___________________
Rev. James W. Clifton
Pastor, St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church

The Hunger Site
Jimmy
Senior Member
 
Posts: 5996
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:11 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Tark » Sun Dec 12, 2010 7:34 pm

As stated before, I don't think that the American Psychotherapy Association, or other O'Block certification bodies, are certification mills in their present form. I do think that they may have had "relaxed" certification standards historically, and that they may still certify many individuals with questionable qualifications for that reason.

In some ways, it might be appropriate to compare the O'Block certification empire to the University of Phoenix. UoP has its roots as the "Institute for Professional Development" in the SF Bay area, but initially ran into serious accreditation problems with WASC. The founder (John Sperling) then moved to Arizona, figured out the minimum level needed to achieve regional accreditation, relaunched his school as the "University of Phoenix" with RA from HLC-NCA, and built a huge national empire. O'Block started issuing professional certifications, ran into some serious credibility problems, figured out the minimum level needed for respectability, and then built a similar empire, only with certifications rather than degrees. Both made a ton of money in the process.

In the long run, both empires face the same problems. Since they are both run on a for-profit basis, they are strongly motivated to put as many credentials in the hands of as many people as possible. Unfortunately, this in turn leads to oversupply, devaluation, and eventually to a backlash; the credential becomes an object of ridicule, rather than respect. UoP is already facing this problem, as its recruiting practices come under fire, and as employers (like Intel or Fedex) refuse to reimburse for UoP tuition. In a competitive market, a UoP degree is at a significant disadvantage relative to a degree from a school with a stronger reputation for academic strength and selectivity.

O'Block certifications are likely to go down the same road. They aren't going to blow up in your face (so "tick, tick, tick" isn't really appropriate), but their value may start to decay as certifications flood the market. In many fields now, there are already complaints about the confusing "alphabet soup" of credentials offered by different professional organizations. As the market becomes increasingly saturated, O'Block certs will likely be at a disadvantage relative to certs issued by other organizations with stronger reputations for selectivity and professional service.
Tark
Senior Member
 
Posts: 590
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:42 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Jimmy » Sun Dec 12, 2010 7:42 pm

Excellent post, Tark. I do agree that initially the Am. Psychotherapy Assn. had some problems which may have stemmed from the grandfathering period. I was a member for many years and didn't renew for several years because I was concerned it was becoming a credential mill. I expressed my concern to them. However, due to the quality of their professional organ, the nationally- and internationally-renowned behavioral scientists associated with them, and the ongoing system of checks and balances within the organization, I renewed last month.
Jimmy
___________________
Rev. James W. Clifton
Pastor, St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church

The Hunger Site
Jimmy
Senior Member
 
Posts: 5996
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:11 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Tark » Sun Dec 12, 2010 7:57 pm

I would suggest critics of the American Association of Psychotherapy view their professional publication, Annals before becoming too critical.

Actually, the correct name of the organization is the "American Psychotherapy Association", not "American Association of Psychotherapy".
Any similarity to the name of the "American Psychological Association" is no doubt coincidental.

I looked at the posted link. I was struck by the amount of advertising for O'Block organizations and certifications in a 32-page publication:

p. 3: Full-page ad for the "Board Certified Professional Counselor" title of the American Psychotherapy Association
p. 4: Half-page ad for "National Association of Integrative Medicine" membership
p. 4: Half-page ad for the American Psychotherapy Association generally, with seven available certifications
p. 27: Half-page ad for the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, and its "Certification in Homeland Security"
p. 27: Half-page ad for the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute, with ten available certifications

So 3 pages, or nearly 10% of the issue, were devoted exclusively to promoting O'Block certifications and memberships.
Tark
Senior Member
 
Posts: 590
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:42 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Jimmy » Sun Dec 12, 2010 8:47 pm

Tark wrote:
I would suggest critics of the American Association of Psychotherapy view their professional publication, Annals before becoming too critical.

Actually, the correct name of the organization is the "American Psychotherapy Association", not "American Association of Psychotherapy".
Any similarity to the name of the "American Psychological Association" is no doubt coincidental.

I looked at the posted link. I was struck by the amount of advertising for O'Block organizations and certifications in a 32-page publication:

p. 3: Full-page ad for the "Board Certified Professional Counselor" title of the American Psychotherapy Association
p. 4: Half-page ad for "National Association of Integrative Medicine" membership
p. 4: Half-page ad for the American Psychotherapy Association generally, with seven available certifications
p. 27: Half-page ad for the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, and its "Certification in Homeland Security"
p. 27: Half-page ad for the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute, with ten available certifications

So 3 pages, or nearly 10% of the issue, were devoted exclusively to promoting O'Block certifications and memberships.


I simply errred; I know it's American Psychotherapy Association. As I said, I was and am concerned about the various credentials but think everything else supercedes that.
Jimmy
___________________
Rev. James W. Clifton
Pastor, St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church

The Hunger Site
Jimmy
Senior Member
 
Posts: 5996
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 9:11 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby doctordoctor01 » Thu Dec 16, 2010 3:50 am

Tark wrote:
I would suggest critics of the American Association of Psychotherapy view their professional publication, Annals before becoming too critical.

Actually, the correct name of the organization is the "American Psychotherapy Association", not "American Association of Psychotherapy".
Any similarity to the name of the "American Psychological Association" is no doubt coincidental.

I looked at the posted link. I was struck by the amount of advertising for O'Block organizations and certifications in a 32-page publication:

p. 3: Full-page ad for the "Board Certified Professional Counselor" title of the American Psychotherapy Association
p. 4: Half-page ad for "National Association of Integrative Medicine" membership
p. 4: Half-page ad for the American Psychotherapy Association generally, with seven available certifications
p. 27: Half-page ad for the American Board for Certification in Homeland Security, and its "Certification in Homeland Security"
p. 27: Half-page ad for the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute, with ten available certifications

So 3 pages, or nearly 10% of the issue, were devoted exclusively to promoting O'Block certifications and memberships.


Did you misread it or misquote it?

There is no such organization with the name "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute."
There is no such organization with the name "National Association of Integrative Medicine."

Search:
https://www.sos.mo.gov/BusinessEntity/s ... tm=9059375
doctordoctor01
New Member
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 5:24 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Tark » Thu Dec 16, 2010 4:47 pm

You got me on the "National Association of Integrative Medicine". I misquoted the name of the "American Association of Integrative Medicine" (AIMM)

However, I did not misread or misquote the name of the "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute", because that really is the way that ACFEI is spelled out in the Annals advertistement that was under discussion. See p. 27 of the link. The "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute" name even has the "service mark" (sm) symbol in this case.

It appears that ACFEI usually stands for the "American College of Forensic Examiners International", but sometimes the "I" stands for "Institute" instead. For example, AFCEI is also an "Institute" on the current, official application form for the ACFEI's "Certified Forensic Social Worker" and "Certified Master Forensic Social Worker" titles. Again, the "sm" symbol is attached to the "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute" name.
Tark
Senior Member
 
Posts: 590
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:42 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby doctordoctor01 » Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:31 am

Tark wrote:You got me on the "National Association of Integrative Medicine". I misquoted the name of the "American Association of Integrative Medicine" (AIMM)

However, I did not misread or misquote the name of the "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute", because that really is the way that ACFEI is spelled out in the Annals advertistement that was under discussion. See p. 27 of the link. The "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute" name even has the "service mark" (sm) symbol in this case.

It appears that ACFEI usually stands for the "American College of Forensic Examiners International", but sometimes the "I" stands for "Institute" instead. For example, AFCEI is also an "Institute" on the current, official application form for the ACFEI's "Certified Forensic Social Worker" and "Certified Master Forensic Social Worker" titles. Again, the "sm" symbol is attached to the "American College of Forensic Examiners Institute" name.


How does one join an (sm)?
doctordoctor01
New Member
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 5:24 pm

Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby John Bear » Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:37 pm

I have received a letter from the law firm representing Dr. O'Block, stating that

"This office has been retained to represent [him] in regard to certain defamatory statements you have been disseminating or have published... Statements that my client has acted wrongfully improperly or unethically in a business capacity amounts to trade libel, a matter that courts take very seriously, and entitle it to monetary damages against you...

My client demands that you immediately stop publishing, republishing or disseminating all defamatory and untrue statements regarding his company. Failure to cease publication of all false statements in the next 10 days will result in a suit being filed against your companies for actual and punitive damages in an amount of $1,000,000.00. Thank you."


(Well, the letter was not in big bold red ink, but it sort of felt that way. All I did, of course, was mention the article in the ABA Journal about Dr. O'Block. Perhaps they subsequently retracted all or part of that article. I shall check. And, for the record, I do not own any companies, all or part, other than publicly-traded stocks.)
John Bear
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:12 am
Location: California

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby John Bear » Wed Jan 26, 2011 2:24 am

jrfletcher12 joins the forum, and defends ACFEI.

And through FaceBook, we learn that he is Joey Fletcher, an employee of ACFEI, which somehow he forgot to mention here.

http://www.facebook.com/people/Joey-Fle ... 1730125995
John Bear
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2006 5:12 am
Location: California

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby networking34 » Thu Sep 08, 2011 2:05 pm

I believe that anyone that is "taken care of" financially and with many, many gifts for himself and his immediate family, would say that Dr. O'Block is a kind, gentle man. It is sad however, that someone of this personality would say something about a man that he knows deep down is manipulative and takes every opportunity to treat his personnel like they are beneath him. If he was such a kind, generous man then why does this jrfletcher12 no longer work at the organization? Why on some of his very last days did he himself endure threats from Dr. Robert O'Block for his current and future career? This does not sound like a kind and generous man. Perhaps jrfletcher12 finally came to the realization after some research and uncovering the truth that this indeed is another form of a certification mill and a company that only cares about money to fund Dr. O'Block's lifestyle and unethical organization.

If you took some time to look at the overall age of the group of employees handling the day to day tasks, online marketing, and web site structure you will find a group of younger individuals that have been pushed and threatened into creating an empire around Dr. Robert O'Block. It is unfortunate that Dr. O'Block feels he has to choose the younger type of employee so that he can control them and make them feel the wrath of his shortcomings. The turnover rate is quite overwhelming.

It is true that due to being uncovered and receiving accusations of being a certification mill that they have "tightened up" their processes and the approval of each application, however it is also true that individuals get declined based on their name as well.

I myself, see the "TOCK" that you speak of coming soon.
networking34
New Member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Sep 08, 2011 1:49 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Gus Sainz » Mon Apr 16, 2012 3:35 pm

FRONTLINE AND PROPUBLICA EXAMINE FORENSIC SCIENCE IN THE COURTROOM

FRONTLINE Presents
THE REAL CSI
Tuesday, April 17, 2012, at 10 P.M. ET on PBS
http://www.pbs.org/frontline/real-csi
http://www.facebook.com/frontlinepbs
Twitter: @frontlinepbs

FRONTLINE also examines what it takes to become credentialed in forensics by the American College of Forensics Examiners International (ACFEI). “It was like an open-book exam basically, and I passed,” says Leah Bartos, a journalism graduate student at UC Berkeley, who demonstrates that for $660 and a few hours taking an open-book exam online, she became certified as a forensic consultant by ACFEI. Bergman’s interview with former CEO John Bridges indicates that 99 percent of those who apply online will become certified by the organization. “There can be no meaningful exam that has a 99 percent pass rate,” admits forensic guru and ACFEI spokesman Cyril Wecht, whose signature appears on ACFEI certificates.
Gus Sainz
Moderator
DegreeDiscussion.com
Gus Sainz
Administrator
 
Posts: 902
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 11:42 pm

No Forensic Background? No Problem

Postby Gus Sainz » Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:28 pm

Over the last two decades, ACFEI has emerged as one of the largest forensic credentialing organizations in the country.

Among its members are top names in science and law, from Dr. Henry Lee, the renowned criminalist and pathologist, to John Douglas, the former FBI profiler and bestselling author. Dr. Cyril Wecht, a prominent forensic pathologist and frequent TV commentator on high-profile crimes, chairs the group’s executive advisory board.

But ACFEI also has given its stamp of approval to far less celebrated characters. It welcomed Seymour Schlager, whose credentials were mailed to the prison where he was incarcerated for attempted murder. Zoe D. Katz – the name of a house cat enrolled by her owner in 2002 to show how easy it was to become certified by ACFEI -- was issued credentials, too. More recently, Dr. Steven Hayne, a Mississippi pathologist whose testimony helped to convict two innocent men of murder, has used his ACFEI credential to bolster his status as an expert witness.

Several former ACFEI employees call the group a mill designed to churn out and sell as many certificates as possible. They say applicants receive cursory, if any, background checks and that virtually everyone passes the group’s certification exams as long as their payments clear.

Some forensic professionals say the organization’s willingness to hand out credentials diminishes the integrity of the field.


But both O’Block and Wecht, the group’s official spokesman, stressed that ACFEI certificates alone don’t make you an expert.

“It’s designed to make somebody feel good, to make them feel they’ve accomplished something, and I would hope they have,” Wecht said in an interview. “Does it really qualify them to be the expert in a particular field? No.”

Wecht also dismissed the notion that the group’s use of “college” in its name could be misleading. “That’s a play on words,” he said. “Nobody believes for one moment that it is a real college.”


Several former ACFEI staffers say they came to question how the group writes and administers its exams.

John Bridges was hired as ACFEI’s president and chief executive in 2010 after decades in government, most recently as an administrator at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He left ACFEI after just nine months, frustrated, he says, by the group’s practices.

“Based on my perception of what went on related to standards and quality, it operated like a certification mill,” he said.


Wecht said he doubted that having the certificate on my resume would be enough to persuade a court to allow me to give expert testimony. Any decent lawyer, he said, could easily cast doubt upon my qualifications.

“A kid right out of law school would say, ‘Ma’am, just exactly what is your training?’” Wecht said. “The point I’m making, you see, is that that piece of paper doesn’t mean that much.”


No Forensic Background? No Problem
Gus Sainz
Moderator
DegreeDiscussion.com
Gus Sainz
Administrator
 
Posts: 902
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2006 11:42 pm

Re: Tick, tick, tick . . .

Postby Fraud Inspector » Sat Jan 19, 2013 6:53 pm

As posted on frontline comments "No Forensic Background No Problem" on May 9, 2012, 10:55 p.m.

People who defend ACFEI are simply defending their own short-cuts desperate to cover up their imminent credentials scandal amongst their colleagues, when in fact they have been gaining bogus fame and stealing referrals. Purchasing such credit card short cuts is nothing short of the clear definition of Inducement Fraud.

Logical and ethical minds can figure this out when they realize that "Zoe the housecat" owned this Diplomate same a prison inmate who had ACFEI certificate mailed to his jail cell :lol: :lol: ...yes ACFEI mailed it to his jail cell, as Professor Of law Carol Henderson wrote in her Book posted on http://www.thepubliccourt.com
! Google:
Cat Gets Board Certified as a Psychologist
or
http://www.ziese.com/Q4Y02NewsLtrPage1.html
:roll:
Once the average trusting citizen reads this site, he/she will understand what is going on exactly?

How many house pets or prisoners or even any medical specialist received fake specialty certification from the one and only well respected American Board of Medical specialties/ABMS? Among hundreds of thousands of such legitimate well board specialists,.... not even a single emember received a mail ordered one.

Since when a Con-Artist will tell you that he/she is one?

For every Con Artist,... there are people who will take the time to skillfully uncover, like PBS and Frontline on April 17,2012. However there are people who will defend such a con, "REGARDLESS" to make sure no body uncovers their misleading and unethical behaviors purchasing fake diplomates(violating the blindly trusting public).

People who bought this ACFEI easy piece of paper, so called certification are unethical enough paying attention to how they look more than who they really are? This ACFEI impressive misleading piece of paper is only an ongoing fraud machine hanging on the practitioner’s walls to mislead the trusting public. US Department of Education, its Distance Learning Dept and FTC all never recognized this ACFEI thing, even once. The only ones who recognize the owner Robert O'Block and his 2500 square foot copy machine home and his useless colored impressive pieces of paper" Fake Diplomate", are the very purchaser whom O'block charged their Credit Cards for purchasing his fake Diplomates thereby winking back and forth at each other,... fooling the trusting public,... with fake credentials!

There are legitimate specialty boards out there that are well respected nationwide wide by ALL well respected academic institutions and universities. Not a single well respected university or college or any school recognizes ACFEI alleged “Diplomate specialization” including the US Department of Education, FOR A REASON. That should speak volumes to any logical mind.
Fraud Inspector
New Member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2013 6:13 pm

Previous

Return to Unaccredited Programs

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron