Ryokan College or SCUPS?

General discussions concerning institutions and degree programs.

Re: Ryokan

Postby vinny123 » Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:43 pm

[quote="searchrescuegirl"]I am in CA. and I plan on becoming a board certified neuropsychologist. Fielding has a certificated 2 year program for that, that I am so thrilled about. They help you obtain a residency and off you go. I do like Ryokan and they have an excellent pass rate for the psycholgy boards exam. Good luck on your decision![/quote]

Hi Searchrescuegirl, I would appreciate your feedback regarding this program due to its very unique learning protocol.

Does Ryokan offer a comprehensive online library? How do you find the rigor of the program? Can you briefly discuss your experiences regarding the online learning process? Are any of the students from states other than California? Any from foreign countries? Do you feel that the thirty thousand plus tuition for this doctoral program is worth the cost even though this degree will not meet licensing criteria for Psychologist in the majority of other states? Are you certain that Fielding will accept one into their doctoral respecialization program with a doctorate from an unaccredited university?

Thanks, Vinny
Vinny
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Postby David » Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:00 am

Hello Search_girl,

I consider myself a geropsychologist and I identify with Division 12 Section 2 although I belong to NAN and Division 40. I'm also a supervisor in a APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship and a number of my students go on into neuropsychology residency programs. What I'm trying to do here is let you know I'm familiar with the landscape.

Your aspirations are terrific but I'm not sure of the feasibility. I poked around Ryokan and Fielding's websites and here's a few thoughts. Fielding's materials indicate the neuropsychology certificate is restricted to licensed psychologists who are graduates of APA programs. A waiver is possible but my guesstimate is an applicant from a program that is neither APA nor RA won't stand much of a chance. Fielding has a reputation for being selective. If you are accepted and complete the certificate program you still won't be board eligible. To become board certified in neuropsychology you'll have to meet the Houston Conference standards which if I recall correctly require an APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship and also a two-year post-doc residency. ABPP is rigorous; it never once crossed my mind to even try.

I wonder if you would share some information with me. How do doctoral students from California-accredited programs go about meeting the internship requirements? I've asked this a couple of times over the years and no one has ever replied. I've been licensed in four states over the years none of which mandated either an APA degree or internship but they all required the completion of an organized internship. By organized I'm thinking along the lines of APPIC.

Thanks,

David
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APA and Ryokan

Postby searchrescuegirl » Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:05 am

Ryokan is approved for the psychology license in CA. so that is what I was looking for. I have done research in the field of neuropsychology and I plan on doing as much as possible to met Fieldings requirements. I have been in contact with them already and will keep the communication open. I have a private practice as I am a licensed MFT and I have a licensed psychologist that will come on board to supervise me for my additional 3000 for licensure. Then hopefully I can go on to the well respected Fielding--it was one of my professors at Ryokan that suggested I go there. I hope that answers some of your questions. Let me know if it didn't. :)
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Re: Ryokan

Postby searchrescuegirl » Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:09 am

Vinny-

The program is fast-paced and challenging. They provide all the articles you need via online sources, except of course the books, which you need to order yourself. It (Ryokan) is adjacent to UCLA so you have free reign of their library if you are in the area.
There are others form different countries and states in the program, yes. I am enjoying it and it will allow me to become licensed in CA. and that is what I needed.
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Re: APA and Ryokan

Postby David » Sat Sep 02, 2006 12:53 pm

searchrescuegirl wrote:I have a licensed psychologist that will come on board to supervise me for my additional 3000 for licensure.


This is starting to help me understand how things work in California. When you say you have a licensed psychologist “come on board” how does this work? By this I mean things like where does the intern see cases (eg, through your existing MFT practice, an agency, through the supervisor's practice), what sort of contractual arrangements exist between the intern, supervisor and the school, what sort of 3rd party insurance arrangements exist, frequency of supervision, proximity of the supervisor (on site, telephone access, etc.), how are different rotations arranged, what incentives exist for the licensed psychologist to agree to provide supervision, and does the supervisor provide something like weekly seminars.
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Re: Ryokan College or SCUPS?

Postby RGable » Fri Jul 18, 2014 8:27 am

For people who might be thinking that where you get your degree will make little difference if and when you get licensed, you should note that potential clients or relatives often DO check credentials. I just yesterday stopped a family member from going to a psychologist who got her Psy.D.degree from Ryokan.
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